4 Reasons to Enjoy Apple Season!

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An apple a day does a lot more than you think

apples in a basket

By Oxfordian Kissuth (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

There’s nothing like the crisp, refreshing feeling of biting into a fresh apple. The sweetness (or tartness, depending on which kind you like) and crunch are a quintessential part of fall, especially here in upstate NY. And it’s just about this time of year that baskets and boxes of the first ripe apples start to show up at farmers markets and natural grocery stores.

When you see fresh apples all piled up in a shiny array of green, red and yellow, it’s only natural to start dreaming of apple crisp, apple cake, apple muffins and, of course, apple pie. What you probably don’t think of at first is the positive effect that this abundant autumn fruit has on your health. Every time you reach for your favorite variety of apple, you’re doing your body a big favor.

High Fiber, Happy Colon

According to the Encyclopedia of Healing Foods,  apples contain high levels of pectin and other fibers, all of which aid digestion by improving motility. Pectin is particularly helpful in that it’s a gel-forming fiber, which not only supports digestive health but also binds with cholesterol and shuttles it out of the body. This prevents the cholesterol from winding up in your blood stream and forming the beginnings of atherosclerotic plaques. It also keeps excess cholesterol out of the bile, thereby improving bile flow and lowering your risk of developing gallstones.

“Phabulous” Phytonutrients

The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods notes that raw, unpeeled apples possess an array of powerful phytonutrients, including ellagic acid, chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid. These are found mainly in the skin along with high levels of flavanoids, most notably quercetin, a potent anti-inflammatory and antihistamine. Removing the peel robs you of the benefits of these powerful compounds, so leave apple skins on whenever possible.

One thing to note: apples come in at the top of the Environmental Working Group’s (EWG) “Dirty Dozen” list, meaning that the skins of non-organic varieties may harbor high levels of pesticide residue. Go organic whenever you can, and when you can’t, use a high-quality veggie wash to thoroughly clean apples before consuming.

apple orchard by apples and pears australia ltd

By Apple and Pears Australia Ltd [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Smack Down Disease

Phytonutrients make apples powerful disease fighters. Despite its unassuming appearance, this humble fruit is able to help your body combat some of the most prevalent diseases in Western society. The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods cites an analysis in which researchers looked at 85 previous studies and found an association between apple consumption and lower instances of:

  • Asthma
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Many types of cancer

These results remained significant even when compared with other types of fruits and vegetables in subjects’ diets. World’s Healthiest Foods notes that one apple contains about 11 percent of the RDA recommendation for vitamin C intake, which could also help explain the fruit’s ability to beat diseases. Vitamin C gives the immune system a boost, and the body can recycle this nutrient more easily when it comes packaged with flavanoids.

As noted above, eating apples may also lower your risk of heart disease. It’s not just the fiber that’s responsible for this power. Polyphenols, another type of phytonutrient, protect against the oxidizing of fats. Known as lipid peroxidation, this process is what causes cholesterol to bind to arterial walls and begin the cascade of immune reactions that results in the formation of arterial plaques.

Everything Tastes Better In Season!

I make this point a lot, but it can’t be said enough: seasonal food is just plain better. There’s a world of difference between the apple you get from your favorite farmers market vendor–or better yet, pick right off the tree–and the one you pick up at the grocery store in the middle of winter. One is crisp, succulent, juicy and filled with all the best that the season has to offer. The other is rock hard, waxy and tasteless.

Why is this? Part of it is the fact that grocery store produce is picked before it ripens, stuffed in trucks and hauled around the country so that, by the time it hits the shelves, it’s traveled as many as 1,500 miles. Seasonal produce, on the other hand, is most often picked when it’s just right for eating and doesn’t have far to go from the farm to your mouth. Seasonal foods have been shown to possess a higher nutrient content than those harvested out of season, likely due in part to the fact that vitamins and minerals are lost during chilling and transportation. Ripeness also plays a role in how much nutrition you get from a food, so be sure to look for apples with firm flesh and vibrant color.
apple muffin with mix ins

Make an Apple (or two) Part of Your Day

To get your daily dose of apples, eat them raw (with the skin on), toss them in your favorite baked goods or make apple peanut butter “sandwiches.” Enjoy them now and all season long for the best flavor and the most health benefits!

Some other delicious ways to eat your apples:

For more information on this amazing fruit, check out NutritionFacts.org and World’s Healthiest Foods!

Want to discover another way to enjoy raw apples? Check out my “Raw Apple Pie, Simplified” class at Honest Weight Food Co-op on September 30th! Registration is free, but please sign up here to let me know you’re coming. Hope to see you there!
The class is now sold out! Can’t wait to see you there.

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3 Cheers for Stone Fruits!

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Healthy benefits from tasty summer treats

I’ll admit it yet again: I’m a sucker for seasonal fruits. And what season is it now? Peach season. Plum season. Nectarine and apricot season.

peachs-1327003 by grafiker

FreeImages.com/grafiker

Excuse me while I drool into the keyboard.

There was a time, believe it or not, when I didn’t like stone fruits. The texture bothered me, and I thought they were oddly tart. Turns out I was eating them all wrong! Stone fruits are best enjoyed at the peak of ripeness–which is right now, when they’re in season, not midwinter after they’ve been trucked to the store from halfway across the country.

These vibrant treats are as nutritious as they are tasty. No matter what your favorite stone fruit is, you get a blast of health-promoting compounds every time you bite into one and let the juice run down your arm.

plum-1225274 by blei

FreeImages.com/blei

Nutrition in Stone Fruits

Stone fruits of all kinds are high in vitamin C, potassium and antioxidants. Though vitamin C builds immunity and supports skin health, and potassium helps maintain healthy fluid balance, it’s the antioxidants that make these fruits truly amazing. Compounds known as polyphenols have been shown to posses anti-cancer properties, and tests on stone fruit extracts display the potential to help people struggling with insulin resistance and glucose sensitivity. In fact, these compounds are so powerful that they may be able to improve all aspects of metabolic syndrome, a condition closely related with the development of Type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

Specific Stone Fruit Benefits

Each type of stone fruit has its own additional perks.

  • Peaches are high in carotenes and flavanoids, which may give them antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. Vitamins A is good for your eyes and aids vitamin C in promoting healthy skin.
  • Plums serve as a source of vitamin K as well as several B vitamins. Phenolic compounds in the fruit display anticancer effects. Plum extracts may be able to kill breast cancer cells without harming the surrounding tissue.
  • The high levels of of beta-carotene in nectarines protect against free radical damage to preserve healthy cells. Antioxidants such as chlorogenic acid and anthocyanins may prevent LDL cholesterol from oxidizing, thereby lowering heart disease risk.
  • Apricots are a good source of iron, which may be easier to absorb thanks to the accompanying vitamin C. Apricots also contain carotenoids and xanthophylls, phytonutrients that are correlated with eye health. Catechins help to protect against inflammation that can cause damage in the body.
  • Cherries are also considered a stone fruit and, according to The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods, contain anthocyanidins that display COX-blocking power on par with that of over-the-counter medications like ibuprofen. They’re also a source of melatonin, the hormone responsible for regulating sleep patterns.

Selecting & Storing

Don’t make the same mistake that I did and settle for mediocre stone fruits! Here’s how to find the best and keep them as fresh as possible:

apricot by _marta_

FreeImages.com/_marta_

  • Look for heavy fruits with intact skins and good color. Avoid green patches and wrinkles.
  • Peaches, plums and nectarines should give a little under gentle pressure. Apricots are ripe when they’re still firm.
  • Stone fruits retain their flavor best if stored at room temperature. Refrigerate if you can’t enjoy them within a couple of days.
  • If your peaches, nectarines, plums or apricots need to ripen, place them in a paper bag on the counter and check them daily until they’re ready.

The best thing about stone fruits, of course, is eating them! Enjoy your favorites straight up (with a napkin handy to catch errant juice trails!) or use them in recipes like crumbles, cobblers and pies. Add them to salads or pair them with savory dishes for a delightful twist. I’ve heard that peaches are even great on the grill! Whatever strikes your fancy, you’ll be supporting optimal health every time you dig in to fresh stone fruits.

Want to learn more about how stone fruits and other plant foods can help you achieve vibrant health? Schedule a FREE Power-Up Prep session with Quantum Vegan today! We’ll get on the phone, talk about your health concerns and set up a plan to get you on track to a healthier future.

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